Wilson Creek

This post was originally published as a gallery page on April 20, 2009. It has been moved into the blog for archive purposes.

Kristen and I spent two nights in the Wilson Creek wilderness area, just south of Grandfather Mountain, over Easter weekend in 2009. We had intended to stay for longer, but, being freshmen backpackers, we weren’t able to accurately pace ourselves using the rough map of the area.

Click any image in the sequence to open up a slideshow viewer.

At least we started the trip on the right note. This was our first time backpacking together, and the first real outing we used our new Canon 450D.

At least we started the trip on the right note. This was our first time backpacking together, and the first real outing we used our new Canon 450D.

 
Our trail followed the Lost Cove Creek for the first four miles. The lightly blazed trail crossed the river every few hundred yards, usually with no 'easy' way across.

Our trail followed the Lost Cove Creek for the first four miles. The lightly blazed trail crossed the river every few hundred yards, usually with no 'easy' way across.

 
We didn't start hiking our first day until about 5:30 p.m., giving just a couple of hours to get familiar with the terrain before we had to set up camp.

We didn't start hiking our first day until about 5:30 p.m., giving just a couple of hours to get familiar with the terrain before we had to set up camp.

 
Kristen managed to find the sun, despite cloudy skies and thick rhododendron overhead.

Kristen managed to find the sun, despite cloudy skies and thick rhododendron overhead.

 
Having not passed anyone but a group of a day hikers who started at the same time as we had, we just set up camp on the trail by the creek our first night.

Having not passed anyone but a group of a day hikers who started at the same time as we had, we just set up camp on the trail by the creek our first night.

 
Posing together after breakfast.

Posing together after breakfast.

 
Much to our surprise, barely 100 feet from our camp site was a beautiful set of waterfalls we lounged by the next morning.

Much to our surprise, barely 100 feet from our camp site was a beautiful set of waterfalls we lounged by the next morning.

 
In April the water was still too cool for swimming, though it was tempting.

In April the water was still too cool for swimming, though it was tempting.

 
wilson-creek-201

Water crashing off a rock

 
wilson-creek-241

We spent hours baking on the cool rock, reading, eating grapes and listening to the rushing water on Easter Sunday.

 
wilson-creek-211

Waterfalls feed a whirlpool perfect for soaking.

 
Kristen and Dulles romping on the rocks.

Kristen and Dulles romping on the rocks.

 
Another mile or so down the trail and we came across this towering blue waterfall that emptied into a multi-tiered lake.

Another mile or so down the trail and we came across this towering blue waterfall.

 
Kristen rests after reading by a mountain lake Sunday afternoon.

Kristen rests after reading by a mountain lake Sunday afternoon.

 
We camped just above this waterfall, which poured down another tier before emptying into a crystal lake.

We camped just above this waterfall, which poured down another tier before emptying into a crystal lake.

 
Camping in the Blue Ridge.

Camping in the Blue Ridge.

 
A mountain watering hole.

A mountain watering hole.

 
Loaded up and ready for the home stretch.

Loaded up and ready for the home stretch.

 
The only crossing where staying dry was an option.

The only crossing where staying dry was an option.

 
Days well spent.

Days well spent.

Advertisements

About David Anderson, Jr.

I'm a wandering pilgrim anchored in the Baptist tradition, tossed about by the anabaptist current. I am a minister at Pullen Memorial Baptist Church and a recent graduate of Campbell Divinity School. I am the husband of a beautiful woman, and the father of a blond-haired boy. I am a work in progress, struggling to work out my own salvation with fear and trembling. View all posts by David Anderson, Jr.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: